Tips to Improve Your Nature Photography

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Take Better Nature Photographs with These Pointers

Learn how no matter what type of camera or experience level you have you can improve your nature pics:

photo tips bruce kirkby

Bruce Kirkby is an adventure photographer. Having won many awards for his photographs, he graciously offers some tips that will help you improve your nature photography whether you are an amateur or professional.

First, be aware of the time of day, weather and lighting conditions.

This may seem like a no-brainer to some people, but especially if you are just starting out, or just starting to get serious about photography this is an important thing that amateurs don’t think about.

Rather than just snapping pictures, if you really want to get stunning images you have to learn to see more like your camera does. Too much light means you don’t get enough detail. Aim for shooting closer to sunrise or sunset, or when it is cloudy out.

The hour just after sunrise and the hour just before sunset are called the “golden hour” in the world of photography…85-90% of professional photos that are sold are taken during these times of day, when the light is softer due to less dynamic range of light.

Don’t put your subject smack dab in the middle of the picture. By placing the subject off-center you create a more dynamic image and cause the viewer’s eyes to move around the photograph.
photo tips Bruce Kirkby
Nature photographers love shooting landscapes. And a stunning landscape photo can be, well, stunning. But adding people to the landscape can sometimes make it much more interesting.
If you have a stunning landscape, including a person off to the side of the shot will give an idea of the human scale and make the shot more interesting.

Notice how the photo above did both of these things–the subject is off center and provides scale to the scene.

Don’t overpack. Keep it light and you will be able to get more shots–and move quickly when you need to.

Avoid using automatic camera settings. These can lead to grainier shots. Instead, switch to manual and use the lowest ISO setting you can.

Follow these tips from Bruce and other professionals and your are on your way to improving your nature photography–and giving pointers of your own!


Thanks to Care2 and the Nature Conservancy of Canada for the original article filled with more tips, it may be read here.

Photo credits: all photos by Bruce Kirkby

Thanks for sharing our love of nature photography!
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