Award Winners Offer Insight to Astronomy Photography

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See 2015’s Best in Astronomy Photography

2016 hopefuls be sure to read how to apply to see how your pics rate!

 Winner of the Aurorae category, "Silk Skies" by Jamen Percy
This incredible photographer was the winner in the Aurorae category. Titled “Silk Skies” this shot by Jamen Percy is striking for the coloring, detail, and the graphic nature of the composition.

The winning photographs may be seen at the Royal Observatory Greenwich in London until 26 June 2016.

There are several categories, including

  • Galaxies
  • Our Moon
  • Our Sun
  • Planets
  • Comets & Asteroids
  • Skyscapes
  • Stars & Nebulae
  • People & Space

There is also a “Special Prizes” category and a competition for young photographers, called “Young Competition”

Certainly there will be shots to amaze every taste at this exhibit. Winning shots are from around the world and are not the stereotypical scientific star shot. Drama and design abound in this annual collection.

You will see unique shimmering phenomena, light from stars billions of light years away, and even human light interacting and competing for attention with the natural wonders.

“Utterly enthralling with moments of brilliance” is how the comedian, impersonator and amateur astronomer Jon Culshaw describes the shortlisted entries in the competition to become the Astronomy Photographer of the Year.

Whether the shot was taken in Norway, in southern France, or even in the UK, the sites are inspiring.

Some of the shots include man-made objects. Even the International Space Station made it into a shot by Daniel Fernandez Caxete in the Our Moon category.

The sun can be challenging to shoot because it gives off so much light. In stark contrast with challenges facing astrophotographers who choose different subjects swaddled in darkness.

While Culshaw can speak eloquently about all the categories, he especially enjoys the People and Space photographs.

“Part of the processing of this category is to reject certain images, where people have stood in what would otherwise been a lovely shot – as if to say LOL or take a selfie.”

The interaction between people and space and be quite striking or subtle. Both can be extraordinarily beautiful.

The winner in this category, “Sunset Peak Star Trail”  was taken by Chap Him Wong in Hong Kong.

The photo was a long exposure. What appears to be rivers of light were torches held by astronomers as the went up and down the hill. As you will note, despite the category title, no humans are actually seen in this photograph, even if the evidence of their existence is.

Sunset Peak Star Trail by Chap Him Wong_2015_People and Space_Winner

“Sunset Peak Star Trail” by Chap him Wong

Be sure to check out other winners, and get ready to submit your best shot. Go ahead and aim for the stars!

2016 Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition

Astrophotographers of all skill levels are invited to submit their best images to the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2016. The 2016 adult and young competitions are now open for entries and the deadline for entries is midday (BST) on 14 April 2016.

Click to get more details for the adult competition and how to enter the young competition.


Images from the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015 competition can be seen at the Royal Observatory Greenwich in London until 26 June 2016.

All images subject to photographer copyright and provided courtesy Astronomy Photographer of the Year/National Maritime Museum.

“Silk Skies” by Jamen Percy

“Sunset Peak Star Trail” by Chap him Wong

Thanks for sharing our love of nature photography!
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